Cary Grant knew Frank Capra was busy casting for his new film, an adaptation of the Broadway hit Arsenic and Old Lace, and he knew that Ronald Reagan and Jack Benny had both turned the lead role down, so he told Capra he was interested and available. Capra was thrilled, and they set to work.

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Does Notorious work better for us than Spellbound did? How are Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman as a couple? And does Claude Rains convincingly play a Nazi war criminal? Tune in to this week’s show to get these answers and more!

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Who do we buy more – Ingrid Bergman as a psychotherapist or Gregory Peck as her boss? How does this mystery hold up against Hitchcock’s other films? And what about that Dalí dream sequence? Tune in to this week’s show to get these answers and more!

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How different is this version than the 1940 version? Did Ingrid Bergman deserve her Academy Award? And why was MGM trying to gaslight the world? Tune in to this week’s show to get these answers and more!

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How involved was Hemingway in this production? Does Bergman have the same chemistry with Cooper that she did with Bogart? Does the adaption work? Tune in to this week’s show to hear these answers and more!

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How well do Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman work on screen together? Does Paul Henreid work as the other man? And how about that song? Tune in to this week’s show to hear us talk about these things and more.

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Irving Rapper’s 1942 film Now, Voyager may have met with mixed reviews but it certainly found its audience, showing that people were thrilled with the on-screen pairing of Bette Davis and Paul Henreid in a story about a woman learning to come out of her shell. It helped that Davis connected so much with this role. She fought for the part and got it, creating one of her iconic and romantic screen personas. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our Bette Davis series with Rapper’s film Now, Voyager.

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Bette Davis was never one to shy away from roles, except perhaps from those that weren’t meaty enough. And she found a lot to work with in Lillian Hellman’s play “The Little Foxes” when William Wyler brought it to the big screen. Join us as we kick off our Bette Davis series with Wyler’s 1941 film The Little Foxes.

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This month in the Speakeasy, director Steve Miner (Friday the 13th Part 2, Halloween H20: 20 Years Later) joins us to talk about one of his favorites, George Cukor’s 1940 film The Philadelphia Story.

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“Ministry of Fear” was Fritz Lang’s third film of four anti-Nazi movies that he made, but it feels less anti-Nazi and more just straight up Hitchcockian thriller. And while Lang didn’t like the final result of the film and Graham Greene, who wrote the novel on which the movie’s based, also didn’t like the film, it’s a very fun film to watch and feels a bit like Lang lite. 

Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we wrap up our Lang series with his 1944 film, “Ministry of Fear.”

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