How does Albert Finney as Hercule Poirot compare to the many other actors who have played him? Is this version a better adaptation than Kenneth Branagh’s? Why was Ingrid Bergman singled out as Best Supporting Actress? Tune in to this week’s show to get these answers and more.

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Bob Clark may be best known for directing his Christmas classic, 1983’s A Christmas Story, but many people don’t know that he got his start in horror like so many other filmmakers, and that one of his first horror films was another Christmas story – Black Christmas. What’s so refreshing about watching this 1974 film is that it’s a slasher film that doesn’t feel as base as so many others that followed suit, but more importantly that it adopted the first person POV shot for the killer. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we discuss this year’s holiday film, Clark’s ‘74 film Black Christmas.

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While The Godfather, Part II didn’t perform nearly as well as its predecessor at the box office, Francis Ford Coppola’s sequel certainly made its money back and, more importantly, has gone on to become a film that’s often cited as one of the greatest films ever made. It even has its contingency of fans who feel it’s the stronger film of the pair. But Coppola went into it not really that excited by the prospect of making a sequel and really only jumped on board because of an idea he had that would blend the storylines of a father and of a son. Join us – Andy Nelson and Pete Wright – as we continue our Godfather trilogy series with Coppola’s 1974 film The Godfather, Part II.

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Ellen Burstyn won her Oscar for Best Actress for her powerful turn as Alice Hyatt in Martin Scorsese’s 1974 film “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore,” and it was clearly well-deserved. Always an actress in pursuit of roles as strong female characters, Burstyn took this film on after her huge success with “The Exorcist.” Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we start our Ellen Burstyn series with “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore.”

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We’re neck-deep in conspiracy this week, movie lovers, as we’re talking about one of the 70s great conspiracy theory thrillers — Alan J. Pakula’s “The Parallax View” from 1974, the second film in his unofficial paranoia trilogy.

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