Coming back just a few short years later, Ice Cube sets his third film in the Friday franchise at Christmastime. It’s a fun shift in the franchise, which also shifts locations yet again to a low-end strip mall where Craig and his cousin Day-Day work as security guards. Cube is yet again tackling the script by himself and bringing on a first-time filmmaker to bring the film to life, this time through music video director Marcus Raboy. Join us as we wrap up our Friday franchise series with Raboy’s 2002 film Friday After Next.

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How well does Cédric Klapisch paint the world of study abroad programs? Why does Audrey Tautou get such prominent billing? And where do we sign up to join the Erasmus Programme?

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Park Chan-Wook never set out to make a trilogy. His ‘vengeance trilogy,’ in fact, only was later dubbed that by international critics who felt the three films were connected through themes of revenge, violence, and salvation. Luckily, he was able to make the second and third films in this ‘trilogy’ because this first one didn’t connect with audiences and it lost money. Join us as we kick off a new series looking at Park Chan-Wook’s Vengeance Trilogy with his 2002 film Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance. 

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Star Trek: Insurrection was a success at the box office, but not so much that the studio felt the need to get another Star Trek film into production right away. In fact, there didn’t seem to be much motivation to make one. That is until John Logan met Brent Spiner and the two not only hit it off but also became intent on writing the next film for the franchise. 

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Zhang Yimou had always wanted to direct an action film, and after years of working on the script, he finally had his chance with his ambitious visual feast, 2002’s Hero. Shot all over China starring some of the hottest Chinese stars telling a story about the assassination attempt on the King of Qin several thousand years ago, the film was the most expensive project in China’s history. Luckily, it also became the highest-grossing up to that point. Considering the last two films we talked about on the show were banned for years, it’s great to see Zhang and China finding a common ground with this film. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our Zhang Yimou series with 2002’s Hero.

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“Infernal Affairs” may have won seven out of the sixteen Hong Kong Film Awards it was nominated for in 2002, including beating Zhang Yimou’s “Hero” as Best Film, but the majority of Americans probably didn’t hear of it until it was remade by Martin Scorsese four years later as “The Departed.” And while that’s a shame that it took so many people so long to discover this 2002 Hong Kong gem by directors Andrew Lau and Alan Mak, it’s great that they did discover it. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our Movies & Their Remakes series with Lau’s and Mak’s crime thriller “Infernal Affairs.”

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It’s easy to compare “City of God” to “GoodFellas” — they both have a frenetic filmmaking style, they both revolve around youth growing up in a world of violence, and they both take that violence to awful places. Plus, they’re both brilliant films. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — this week on The Next Reel as we finish our Foreign Language series with a true highlight — Fernando Mereilles’ and Katia Lund’s 2002 film “City of God.”

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We continue our Romantic Comedy series with a film that really puts that genre to the test — 2002’s About a Boy, directed by Chris and Paul Weitz. Is it a RomCom? Is it a comedy drama? Or a RomComDram? It’s hard to say, but it is a great film that is full of honesty, heart, and human connection. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we talk about this great film.

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Zombies had notoriously been slow entities—let’s face it, the walking dead just don’t move so fast. But then Danny Boyle came along and, with writer Alex Garland, injected the zombie sub-genre with speed in their film “28 Days Later.” The zombies became fast creatures. And all the more terrifying because of it.

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This week, movie lovers, we begin our series on the Bourne movies, starting here with Doug Liman’s 2002 film, The Bourne Identity. Born from Robert Ludlum’s classic spy thriller, this movie came out a time when the spy film genre was feeling a little… overstuffed. This film, as well as the two that followed it, proved that a spy film could be more than just action scenes loosely strung together with threads of a weak story.

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