Stieg Larsson had plans to write an entire series of Millennium novels, but unfortunately died having only written three of them. Because of this, they’re often referred to as the Millennium trilogy. Sure, they have the same characters largely and are centered around the Millennium magazine, but it’s not really a trilogy per se. That being said, when making the three films, it didn’t stop the team from shooting them all back to back to keep the story as cohesive as possible. It doesn’t help that the third film, Daniel Alfredson’s 2009 The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets’ Nest, starts to feel a bit like the storytellers are stretching credulity a bit.

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Stieg Larsson’s second novel in the Millennium trilogy, “The Girl Who Played With Fire,” saw the continuation of the story of Lisbeth Salander and Mikael Blomqvist while they try to stop a sex trafficking ring in Sweden. The whole trilogy of books was a massive success, but the film version was given half the budget of the first film for some reason, while also being paired with a different director. Daniel Alfredson put together an effective film, even if it feels a bit average at times.

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With the international success of Stieg Larsson’s novel “Men Who Hate Women” and its sequels, it was inevitable that a cinematic version would be made. The three films that make up Larsson’s ‘Millennium Trilogy’ were made back to back and were all released in Sweden in 2009 before making their way around the world to financial and critical success. The first film, Niels Arden Oplev’s The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, introduced the world cinematically to both Lisbeth Salander and the actress who portrayed her – Noomie Rapace.

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Anyone who has seen a Ricardo Darín film knows he has very expressive eyes. The actors in the 2009 film El Secreto de Sus Ojos, or The Secret in Their Eyes, had to have more than just expressive eyes, though. They had to be able to carry heavy amounts of subtext in their eyes. And while director Juan José Campanella’s film is largely a detective story as Darín and his team work to solve a cold case, it’s also a story about unrequited love. Luckily, Campanella had worked with Darín before so he knew Darín could do it. And Darín pulls it off effortlessly, along with his costars Soledad Villamil and Guillermo Francella. Join us as we continue our series on actor Ricardo Darín with Campanella’s 2009 film The Secret in Their Eyes

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With the financial disappointment of Star Trek: Nemesis, Paramount wasn’t so sure they would return to the well again. But in 2005, when Viacom/Paramount split from CBS, they had to get a movie in the works or risk losing rights to the property. Hence, Star Trek was born. But screenwriters Robert Orci, Alex Kurtzman and director JJ Abrams didn’t want to continue the story from where it left off — they felt it had been played out. They went back to one of the early ideas to have Kirk and Spock in their Academy years.

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Bong Joon-ho’s follow-up feature to his massive success “The Host” was about a murder and the person trying to figure out what happened. To some people, it sounded awfully like his second film “Memories of Murder” and they were afraid he was returning to the safety of familiar territory. But 2009’s “Mother” ended up being a very different film and one which is hard to forget. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we continue our Bong Joon-ho series with “Mother.”

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Considering how much critics and audiences seem to hate Alex Proyas’ 2009 film Knowing, it’s surprising that it actually did fairly well at the box office. We don’t know if that’s proof that people actually like it, but it was hated enough that Andy felt it was appropriate to call it a guilty pleasure of his. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we finish up our short and fun Guilty Pleasure Series with Proyas’ Knowing.

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It’s October, which must mean it’s time for another month of horror, right? Wrong! This month, we’re turning the tables on all the Freddies and Jasons and Michaels and will be spending the month talking about romantic comedies! Our first stop? Marc Webb’s feature film debut, 2009’s “(500) Days of Summer.” Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we discuss one of our favorite romantic comedies out there.

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Our original science fiction series continues with Duncan Jones’ fascinating film debut from 2009, Moon. Made for a low budget, this entry into the science fiction genre showed that you didn’t need a $100 million budget to tell a science fiction story that makes you think while also being a great story. Sure, it has its problems, but it’s easy to forgive when it’s as fascinating to watch as Moon is. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we talk about it on this week’s episode of The Next Reel.

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Kathryn Bigelow made a big change in her career direction as a film director when she made 2009’s “The Hurt Locker.” While it still had the adrenaline action sensibilities she displayed in her prior films, this film was less of a Hollywood action movie and more of an honest portrayal of soldiers in a war. This week on The Next Reel, join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we delve into Bigelow’s independent war film that made her the first woman to win a Best Director Oscar.

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