Phew. This film should be required viewing for all high school seniors. It’s brutal and intense, but also honest and powerful in its depiction of addiction. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we finish up our series on the immensely gifted actress Ellen Burstyn with Darren Aronofsky’s 2000 film “Requiem for a Dream.”

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It’s pretty rare for a film to come along that has such a visceral effect on people when they’re watching it where they faint or throw up because it’s so overwhelming. When “The Exorcist” was released just after Christmas in 1973, it had that effect. People flocked to it in droves and seemed to have these heightened reactions to it, whether because they were so scared or they felt it was truly evil. It’s a fascinating case study in how religion and horror draws people to the theatre. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we continue our Ellen Burstyn series with William Friedkin’s “The Exorcist.”

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Ellen Burstyn won her Oscar for Best Actress for her powerful turn as Alice Hyatt in Martin Scorsese’s 1974 film “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore,” and it was clearly well-deserved. Always an actress in pursuit of roles as strong female characters, Burstyn took this film on after her huge success with “The Exorcist.” Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we start our Ellen Burstyn series with “Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore.”

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