One of the interesting things to explore in the usage of found footage style films is how it can be applied to different genres. Okay, so it works better in some genres than others, but it’s not a genre in and of itself, nor is it restricted to horror movies. But one thing that is consistent is the fact that we’re watching real people in a real situation they likely didn’t survive. There is an inherent connection to reality that isn’t present in other styles of films because of this, and in a film like Norway’s ‘Trollhunter,’ it ups the stakes because everything feels that much more real. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we wrap up our found footage series with André Øvredal’s 2010 fantasy thriller ‘Trollhunter.’

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When making found footage style films, it’s important to stick with the conceit — someone is holding the camera and filming events as they happen, then we someone later stumble upon the footage and watch it to understand what happened. What’s great about Josh Trank’s 2012 debut film ‘Chronicle’ is that he takes that conceit and finds ways to use it to his advantage while also exploring ways to break out of the conceit with multiple cameras and camera movement. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we continue our found footage series with this great superhero film.

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The J.J. Abrams team jumped into the found footage realm with a fun Godzilla-style monster movie that was kept under strict wraps while filming, to the point where excited audience members actually believed that it might have possibly been a live-action version of Voltron. “Cloverfield,” which, in the film, is the name the government gives to this top secret creature after-the-fact, is a unique creature feature that at once allowed for an intimate story set in a massive location. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we discuss Matt Reeves’ 2008 film “Cloverfield.”

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For many audience members, found footage films are just an opportunity to film a horror story on the cheap and don’t bring anything to the table. There are films, however, that work to use the filmmaking style to their advantage in exploring different ways to tell their stories. Sure, it’s a conceit, but if you buy into it, it can make for a fun style of storytelling. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we begin our Found Footage Series with John Erick Dowdle’s 2008 film “Quarantine.”

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