Is 2001 really one of the greatest films ever made or could Kubrick have used a better editor? Does the monolith really represent the movie screen? Is HAL one of the cinema’s great villains? Tune in this week to get these answers and more!

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Stanley Kubrick didn’t do comedy often which is a shame because “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” is arguably one of the funniest films ever made. What’s interesting is that Kubrick intended on making a serious film about one of his greatest fears at the time: the threat of nuclear war. But after several attempts at finding the right way to tell the story seriously (including one involving aliens watching us from above, discussing our penchant for destruction), he hit on the idea of making it funny. And his dark comedy classic was born.

Join us – Andy Nelson and Pete Wright – as we wrap up our brief vacation challenge with Andy’s choice of his favorite end-of-the-world comedy, Kubrick’s 1964 film “Dr. Strangelove.”

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Stephen King may not have been a fan of what Stanley Kubrick did when he turned King’s third novel, “The Shining,” into one of his films, but audiences didn’t seem to mind. King purists still have problems with some of Kubrick’s decisions, but the film has withstood the test of time and still stands up as one of the great horror movies out there. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we begin our Stephen King series with Kubrick’s “The Shining.”

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Stanley Kubrick’s 3rd film, “The Killing,” was a box office bomb due to a poor release plan from United Artists and virtually no marketing. Luckily, the film was critically praised and has grown in stature since its release in 1956. It’s a film noir about a race track heist gone wrong with the fantastic Sterling Hayden leading the charge, and the last film in our Heist series. Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we finish this series with Kubrick’s early classic.

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