Victor Fleming didn’t just direct two movies in 1939, he directed two of what many consider to be the greatest films made – ”Gone With the Wind” and “The Wizard of Oz.” Where the former, though, has more problems to contend with in today’s society, what with its depiction of slavery and race in the South during the Civil War, the latter is nothing but pure cinematic joy. Seen by more people than any other movie, “The Wizard of Oz” has become infused in who we are. Quotes from the movie can pop up in everyday conversation without people even realizing they’re quoting it. The songs – particularly “Over the Rainbow” – have been burned into our brains at an early age. It truly is a shining example of what cinema can be. Join us – Pete Wright and Andy Nelson – as we continue our ‘films of 1939’ series with one of the great cinema achievements, Flemings’ “The Wizard of Oz.”

Listen Now

Considering the racially-charged climate of the US right now, it’s oddly perfect timing that we’re starting our 1939 series with “Gone With The Wind,” a film as technically brilliant to look at as it is hard to watch because of it’s portrayal of slavery and the ‘lost cause’ Southern view of the Civil War. It certainly gives us a lot to talk about in this episode! Join us — Pete Wright and Andy Nelson — as we dive into Victor Fleming’s “Gone With The Wind.”

Listen Now