Series Archive

1965 BAFTAs Best Film From Any Source Nominees

Each episode of The Next Reel Film Podcast is a part of a series or collection of films brought together by time, idea, or contributor. Looking to build a great watchlist? You can’t go wrong with starting on a Next Reel Series.

The Next Reel • Season 13 • Series: 1965 BAFTAs Best Film From Any Source Nominees • The Train
The Next Reel Film Podcast

The Train

We wrap up our conversations about the 1965 BAFTAs Best Film From Any Source Nominees with a discussion about John Frankenheimer’s brilliant film The Train. It’s got Burt Lancaster as a French train man helping keep the Nazis from stealing art from their museums near the end of WWII, and holds up exceptionally well. Tune in!

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The Next Reel • Season 13 • Series: 1965 BAFTAs Best Film From Any Source Nominees • The Pumpkin Eater
The Next Reel Film Podcast

The Pumpkin Eater

We continue our series looking at the 1965 BAFTAs for the nominees of the Films From Any Source category, this time with a conversation about Jack Clayton’s The Pumpkin Eater. Easy to say we loved this powerful drama.

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The Next Reel • Season 13 • Series: 1965 BAFTAs Best Film From Any Source Nominees • Becket
The Next Reel Film Podcast

Becket

We kick off our next series looking at the 1965 BAFTA Best Film From Any Source Nominees. First up, it’s a battle between church and state, between friends, between Normans and Saxons. Plus, Peter O’Toole and Richard Burton cavorting like pros. It’s Peter Glenville’s 1964 film Becket! Tune in!

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The Next Reel • Season 13 • Series: 1965 BAFTAs Best Film From Any Source Nominees • Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
The Next Reel Film Podcast

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

Stanley Kubrick didn’t do comedy often which is a shame because “Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb” is arguably one of the funniest films ever made. What’s interesting is that Kubrick intended on making a serious film about one of his greatest fears at the time: the threat of nuclear war. But after several attempts at finding the right way to tell the story seriously (including one involving aliens watching us from above, discussing our penchant for destruction), he hit on the idea of making it funny. And his dark comedy classic was born. Join us – Andy Nelson and Pete Wright – as we wrap up our brief vacation challenge with Andy’s choice of his favorite end-of-the-world comedy, Kubrick’s 1964 film “Dr. Strangelove.”

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