Unique ADHD Strategies That Work! At least most of the time! • Part 1

We learned so much from you all in our last series that we’re keeping the party going! This week, and for the next few episodes, we’re sharing your submissions for unique AHD strategies that work … MOST of the time. We all know that not every strategy works forever, but if we can learn a few from one another to get us over the next challenge, so much the better!

This week, listener submissions to help you get started on projects and tackle task management!

Links & Notes


Episode Transcript

Brought to you by The ADHD Podcast Community on Patreon

Pete Wright:
Hello everybody. And welcome to Taking Control: The ADHD Podcast on TruStory FM. I’m Pete Wright and I am here with Nikki Kinzer.

Nikki Kinzer:
Hello, everyone. Hello, Pete Wrights.

Pete Wright:
Hello, Nikki Kinzer. We finished our epic series.

Nikki Kinzer:
I know, it was so fun.

Pete Wright:
I know. Of interviews. And now we’re doing more listener stuff.

Nikki Kinzer:
We are.

Pete Wright:
What’s that all about?

Nikki Kinzer:
We’re continuing with this fabulous trend that we started.

Pete Wright:
Weirdly, it’s like, you’d think, “Oh, all the listeners are writing you with ideas. What do we even do anymore?”

Nikki Kinzer:
We talk about them. We share them.

Pete Wright:
We sure do. There’s so many great ideas that are coming in here. This week, we’re starting our series of unique ADHD strategies that work at least most of the time. So we always have that caveat. At least most of the time.

Nikki Kinzer:
Not always.

Pete Wright:
They work a lot, but not always. Yeah, but that’s okay because we don’t celebrate the other part. We just celebrate when they work and try to get better. And that’s what we’re going to talk about. Some of these skills Nikki has gone through and done the yeoman’s work of actually separating them all and batching them into-

Nikki Kinzer:
Something.

Pete Wright:
Containers, boxes and things-

Nikki Kinzer:
Some kind of buckets. Yeah.

Pete Wright:
So that we can… Yeah, so we could split them out over a couple of weeks here as we sort through all these wonderful contributions. Today, we’re going to be talking about task management systems and I can’t wait to get started on that.
Before we do that, head over to takecontroladhd.com. You can get to know us a little bit better. You can listen to the show right there on the website or subscribe to the mailing list right there on the homepage. And we’ll send you an email each time a new episode is released. Connect with us on Twitter or Facebook @takecontroadhd.
And don’t forget, as Brian asked in the chat room, is my dog 100% Patreon? Well, not yet because he doesn’t have a wallet, but once he does, I’m going to invite him to head over to patrion.com/theadhdpodcast. And you can check out what we do on the show. If the show has ever touched you, if the work that we’ve done or the resources that we’ve shared have ever touched you and how you live your life with ADHD, we invite you to support us directly. Patreon is listener supported podcasting. It allows you to support the work we do and ensure that we can keep doing it. And the more we get out of Patreon, the more we can invest our time and attention to this show and creating more resources for you. We’re very excited to keep doing that. 2021 is shaping off very well. And so we’re thrilled to be in this sort of partnership with all of you. If you haven’t considered yet, again, patreon.com/theadhdpodcast.
If you have, if you’re already a supporter, you’re probably listening to me talk about this on our live stream right now because that’s one of the fantastic perks. Join the live streams, get access to our double secret, triple secret members channels in our discord online server and all that, and all the other wonderful member benefits. Patreon.com/theadhdpodcast. Do we have any other news?

Nikki Kinzer:
Same news, but it’s fantastic news.

Pete Wright:
Okay.

Nikki Kinzer:
Study hall, Thursday afternoons, come join me. GPS, guided planning sessions are going to be opening up for April. And so, yeah, definitely check that out. And I’ll talk about more of it later, but I’ve got to throw those two cents in, those two services.

Pete Wright:
Absolutely, you do. I would expect nothing less. And thank you everybody for listening to this segment. Don’t forget to tip your servers. And now back to the show,
All right, Nikki Kinzer unique ADHD strategies that work at least most of the time.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yes.

Pete Wright:
You got to throw that in there.

Nikki Kinzer:
So what’s interesting about this is this idea came from when we did the interviews, right? And so the last show we were going to do a couple of interviews, and then I was afraid that we might not have enough time. And so I was going to add three unique ADHD strategies that I’ve learned from my clients. Well guess what happens?

Pete Wright:
There were more than that.

Nikki Kinzer:
Well, no, that’s actually… You’re ahead of the game. What happened is we had these fabulous interviews and we didn’t have to worry about time. So trying to squeeze in unique strategies at the end of our interview last week would have seemed kind of silly. So you and I, Melissa had a talk and we said, “Let’s ask our Patreon members, what do they do that is unique and what kind of strategies work for them?” And boy, did we get a response. So cool.

Pete Wright:
Yeah. There are a lot of unique strategies that work some of the time.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yeah. Yeah. So I was able to incorporate the three that I was going to add, and then everything else that everybody else has to add. So what we’re going to do is go through those. And if we have something to say, we’ll say it, and if not, I just want to say thank you to everybody for sharing, because I’m positive that somebody’s going to walk away from the show with some kind of new nugget that they want to try.

Pete Wright:
All about the nuggets. I think it’s fantastic. And yeah, if there’s something that you get out of somebody else’s experience, use it, share it broadly. We’re all in this together people.

Nikki Kinzer:
That’s right. And I’m going to start with the first one, because this is one of my client ideas. Okay. Task manager systems, that’s where we’re going to start. And boy, this is a hot topic because it is really difficult to try to figure out what’s going to work and there’s a lot involved and there’s habit building and there’s things you just have to do. And so I’ve been working with this gal and what we found to be the best system for her is probably one of the most creative that I have found and definitely out of the box. So what she has done and we did this together is she did a master list mind map.

Pete Wright:
Okay. What does that look like?

Nikki Kinzer:
So it looks like a lot of stuff on a piece of paper. So she starts just with everything, like what are the projects that I have to do? So that’s kind of where it started was here’s my brain that is running a hundred miles per hour. And what are the things that I’m focusing on? What work projects, she’s a gardener, she’s going to be retiring soon. So there’s these little sections of her life that she put into the mind map. And then after we did the mind map, she took a, and this was on a clipboard. So the mind map was on a clipboard and she carried around.

Pete Wright:
Okay, so it’s paper. It’s not like an-

Nikki Kinzer:
It’s paper. Yes. And so the next session after she got done with the mind map, we said, “Okay, so let’s look at one of the sections that you have here and let’s start a new mind map.” So we took the gardening piece and she started a new mind map that was just about gardening. And it had tools that she wanted to buy and timelines around when to buy or when to plant things and all of that. And so it was her own little mind map of gardening. And then she would put her to-do list underneath the mind map or in front of the mind map. I don’t know. But anyway, that clipboard, that specific clipboard was now all about gardening.
This is her task management system. It works. I’m telling you, that’s why I want to start off with this because I think we sometimes think that it has to be so complicated and it doesn’t. So what she has done is she has different clipboards for different areas of her life that she breaks down and goes through them and decides, okay, this is what I need to do. And then she’ll have another mind map that will say Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. And that’s when she’s saying, when I’m doing this on Monday, when I’m doing this on Tuesday and whatnot.

Pete Wright:
I love it. I love it.

Nikki Kinzer:
I mean, it’s so creative. So I said, “And who cares if you have like 10 clipboards on your wall?”

Pete Wright:
Well, that’s what I was imagining. You have all of these like hooks, like command strip hooks of clipboards. And you’re just moving them around depending on how your clipboard mind map, your clip map changes.

Nikki Kinzer:
I love it.

Pete Wright:
Yeah.

Nikki Kinzer:
Not going to work for everybody.

Pete Wright:
That’s right. Well, you need some wall space to make that work.

Nikki Kinzer:
You need some wall space. You need to get some clipboards.

Pete Wright:
You definitely need some wall space.

Nikki Kinzer:
But I love the creativity. And I think more than anything to our listeners, don’t give up, there is something out there that will help you. And it may be as crazy as having a bunch of clipboards. Who knows?

Pete Wright:
Well, and I think that’s really important because that outlines one of the things that we talked about in our mind-mapping episode so long ago, which was like radiant associations. And sometimes I think when you get to the end of an arm in what’s already kind of a big mind map, you think, “Oh, let’s do big. I’ll just like bundle in my head the word gardening. And I’ll know what that means later. I’ll know what that means.” But you don’t know what that means. And until you get out the next clipboard, you don’t get to experience the benefit of radiant associations, of knowing how these things relate to one another. And that’s really important. I love it.

Nikki Kinzer:
All right.

Pete Wright:
Okay. So I guess talk about Chris?

Nikki Kinzer:
Yes, you do.

Pete Wright:
Chris, who submitted this on discord. I have a whiteboard that I write things on as they pop into my head, it used to be on my fridge, but now that I work from home, it’s next to my desk. I use different colored markers for it too. That way, when I think of something I add it on there, and then it’s out of my head and I have a visual reminder. Then I periodically use the whiteboard list to make smaller lists and set reminders for myself. I assume in other systems.
I have noticed a lot of this. One of the things that my younger child has been doing a lot, they have a whiteboard for their school stuff and they actually write on it and then they hold it up in the camera in Zoom and show kind of what they’re doing. And I think it’s really wonderful having that size whiteboard that’s kind of bigger than a sheet of paper, but still super, super portable that you can take with you and lean up against a wall or put on a bookshelf or something, that’s always right in front of you. I love the idea of both that it’s ever present. It’s always somewhere in front of you. It’s hard to lose because it’s kind of big enough and white, unless you stack a bunch of stuff on top of it, but also it reduces friction of getting things out of your head. And so I think that’s really, really handy. Yeah.

Nikki Kinzer:
Absolutely. One thing I would add here too, is that a lot of the students that I work with, a lot of the college students will have a calendar that will usually be in their phone, like iCal or Google Cal or whatever. And they’ll set all of the due dates and important dates in the calendar, but they’ll have a whiteboard that they use on a weekly basis. So they’ll take what they need to do that week and put it on the whiteboard. And that works, that really works. So, yeah, again, be creative.

Pete Wright:
What does Carla have to say?

Nikki Kinzer:
So Carla says I went paperless years ago because I kept losing notes or changing notebooks or forgetting to check them. I have tried a ton of different systems, but in the end, what works best for me is setting alarms on my phone for everything. Making lists in my notes app that I can check off, setting reminders for time sensitive work and calendars with alarms for appointments and commitments for me and the family.
I think Carla has definitely mastered the reminders and the alarms strategy because yeah, you need to have them. Absolutely. And that’s a great example.

Pete Wright:
Yeah. Yeah. I think so too. I think going paperless without having a system that allows you to do this stuff like remind you to do the important stuff, remind you to pay the right bills at the right time, that it can be a recipe for confusion and loss. And so it’s really important those two things go together.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yeah. Absolutely.

Pete Wright:
I put reminder boards… Is this also Carla?

Nikki Kinzer:
No. This is somebody else, didn’t have a name.

Pete Wright:
Somebody else, all right. No name. I put reminder boards like dry erase boards in the areas between to make sure I have to look at them as I’m walking past. And I update them with thoughts, grocery lists, to do’s, et cetera, as I walk by so that my inconsistency with planning tools has a backup that also can be interacted with by everyone else in the house. I think this is great. I am having a little bit of trouble imagining how many whiteboards you might have to work with. Do you have a sense of that?

Nikki Kinzer:
No, but I just imagine this hallway as like all clipboards and all whiteboards.

Pete Wright:
And all whiteboards on the other side, yeah.

Nikki Kinzer:
Somebody is going to send us that picture like, “I did both.”

Pete Wright:
Yeah. Nailed it.

Nikki Kinzer:
I nailed this. Yeah.

Pete Wright:
Yeah. I think for, and this is where what works for you, right? I feel like if I have too many whiteboards and they’re in multiple places, I’m going to start losing track of reviewing them.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yeah. Right.

Pete Wright:
I can imagine my house works with a giant whiteboard, because there’s one. It’s in a central location. Everybody has access to it. We all pass it and see it every day, major thoroughfare. If I started putting littler whiteboards on different places, I would not do well.

Nikki Kinzer:
No. And I think that what she’s saying, and I don’t know she or he, I really don’t know who this is. So I don’t know if they’re saying that they have a bunch of them in different places, but I have a sense that they’re probably using it the same way that you just explained. And we have a it’s kind of like a part of the command center is almost what I’m picturing this. Every family member has access to it. And if you’re running out of something, milk, eggs, whatever, that’s kind of how I see it.

Pete Wright:
Yeah. Me too. How about Heidi?

Nikki Kinzer:
Heidi. I keep a designated notebook for brain dumping right next to me while I work. Heidi, I do the same thing. A items pop into my mind, I jot them down and I go back to what I was working on. Great idea. So I don’t get derailed and sent off in 50 different directions. At the end of the day, I add these items to my master brain dump list. Many of these items may already be on the list, but that’s okay. If I jot them down as they pop in my head, then I can deal with them later while at the same time be reassured that I haven’t missed anything.

Pete Wright:
I love that one because and I don’t know that we’ve ever talked about this. It’s okay to write something down twice.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yeah, right. Yeah.

Pete Wright:
Right? You’ll sort it out in the brain dump when you go through to actually put stuff in the right places at the right time. Don’t worry about having already documented a task or something that you just remembered and just wanted to get it out of your head because the goal is not to have a clean brain dump list. The goal is to get your head clear. And so that’s okay.

Nikki Kinzer:
Well, she talks about having a designated notebook because I do, I do the same thing. I have this little tiny like notebook. I don’t know what size this does. It’s not a full page, but anytime I’m on the phone with someone and I need to be reminded to do something, I’ll put it on here. So what am I looking at right now? I’m looking at calendar. Third party. I don’t know what that is. See? I…

Pete Wright:
There’s an important safety tip: be able to read your own writing.

Nikki Kinzer:
How to remember reminders to do list. I’ll add projects from reminder to do list. To do list. I don’t know. I was talking to them about to do list, so, okay. Scratch. That’s not such a great idea, but when-

Pete Wright:
All of this is staying in the show. Every bit of this is staying in the show. That’s brilliant.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yes, it is. But I will tell you when it does make sense. In fact, I talked to my GPS group about this because this morning we were doing our planning and I had like, I don’t know, maybe 10 of these sheets that were all torn out. And I had to go through each of them. And these are the ones I saved. I know visually people can’t see this, but these are the ones that saved because they mean something. And I can see what they meant. But what I’m going to do with these now is put them into my things. So there is a system. It’s like, it went on paper and then I sort it. And now it’s going to go into my task management system, except for this one that I have no idea why there’s a third party and why there’s a calendar and why… Oh, I do know why I need to trust it. I do need to trust my calendar. So that’s important. Yeah. There you go.

Pete Wright:
Oh, that’s really funny. All right. Okay. I’ve got another anonymous. I have been using the medium method since the beginning of the year using a paper planner and then copying it over to a digital system. The review copy aspect does seem to help things soak into my brain a bit better. I use Rocketbook for a lot of this because it allows me to send my paper notes and to do’s to the cloud. I use Trello as my Rocketbook destination so I can see everything. And then I can do the rest of the review on my phone, putting to do’s in to do list, et cetera. During bath time for the kids, whenever. I thought I’d always be fully digital. But what I’ve found in the last few years is A, fully digital systems can be too intangible, and therefore don’t always feel real to me and B, I like stickers and washi tape and pretty pens and stuff makes using the planner actually fun.

Nikki Kinzer:
I really like this too. I like all of these strategies, but I do like that they again, you have to do what works for you. And it’s okay to have a combination of things where you can look at your list and you can put it somewhere. The only thing I would be careful of, and I would be really curious to know how she uses Trello and to do list because it seems like it’s a little bit repetitive. So I would want to know what she’s doing there. But with that being said, I think that when you do use different things, different systems to manage your tasks, just be really clear with what each thing is there for you to do.
So for example, like, if you’re going to use to do list, but you’re also going to use a paper planner, what are you doing in to do list? What are you doing in the paper planner? Because if you put something in the paper planner and you don’t see it because you turn the page and it’s not on to do list, you’re probably going to forget about it. So it’s just important that you’re really clear on how these things work and what the purpose is. But what I like about it is that you can do more than one thing. I use things, but then I will also use the paper planner to put the top three things that I’m doing that day so that I don’t have to keep looking at my list. So there are ways to do it. But does that make sense? Just being really clear.

Pete Wright:
Yeah, absolutely. And I do want to shout out, we’ll put a link in the show notes to Rocketbook. It’s very cool in terms of just having this tool with essentially reusable paper, it’s very cool, and super digital, each page has a little bar code on it, so you can get things online and it’s really great. Just what’s they say? Just add a drop of, and you can wipe the page clean.

Nikki Kinzer:
Oh, that’s cool.

Pete Wright:
And so their mission is really, one of, I don’t think is primarily one of productivity, but it’s a very cool system that also is highly sustainable. So lots of different products that you can pick up on the Rocketbook page. Very cool.

Nikki Kinzer:
That’s great.

Pete Wright:
Company.

Nikki Kinzer:
All right. So Benjamin. I have a hard time saying that word, Benjamin from Facebook. Bullet journal. I used to use planning books from Office Depot, Walmart, et cetera, but I could not stick to it consistently. And looking at those blank dates was discouraging, but with a bullet journal, I can create planner pages. And if I miss a week of planning pages, I can just continue without wasting paper. That is definitely the benefit of the bullet journal. It’s so flexible, which is really nice.

Pete Wright:
Yeah. There’s a lot of good that can come out of the do it yourself stuff.

Nikki Kinzer:
Absolutely.

Pete Wright:
I just can’t get my head around it for me. I can’t do it.

Nikki Kinzer:
I can for a lot of it, but I have a hard time… I don’t think I would use the bullet journal as a calendar I wouldn’t put my appointments and stuff in there, but I could do to do lists and tracking stuff. And yeah, I mean, I like thinking that I could have a place of books that I want to read later, that kind of thing, but yeah. Again, everybody’s so different.

Pete Wright:
Yeah, right. Katie from discord writes stationary. I keep a lot of fun stickers post-its and fun pieces of paper around that I can add to my bullet journal or to my desk to remind me or reward myself. I found that crossing things off my list wasn’t very satisfying for me. So it was helpful to get little smiley face stickers instead, I even use them for articles and assignments I have to finish for school. If I finish an article, it gets a smiley face on it.

Nikki Kinzer:
That’s awesome. I love that.

Pete Wright:
I think so too. I love stickers.

Nikki Kinzer:
I do too.

Pete Wright:
I’m a huge fan of stickers. I don’t put them on paper. I put them on stuff.

Nikki Kinzer:
Right. Yes.

Pete Wright:
Here’s a… I got my-

Nikki Kinzer:
Oh yeah, you got stickers on your iPad.

Pete Wright:
iPad covered stickers. iPad case.

Nikki Kinzer:
Oh yes you do.

Pete Wright:
Yeah, cover it. I love all of that stuff.

Nikki Kinzer:
That’s fun.

Pete Wright:
But I don’t usually use them because everything is so digital already. It’s all in there already. Yeah. I need more stickers.

Nikki Kinzer:
You really do.

Pete Wright:
That’s why I think I’m a sucker for stickers. I’m a sticker sucker.
So those are some of the task management systems that help people manage their things. But once you have all your tasks in your task management system, how do you get started, Nikki? I bet you’re wondering.

Nikki Kinzer:
I am wondering, and here is the second ADHD strategy that I learned from one of my past clients. And I did it this weekend even because it works. It works. So what he would do is he would watch a football game live, right? So he’d be watching football. And then when the commercial came, he would go do something during the commercial. So he’d load the dishes or put a load of laundry in or sweep whatever. And then when the commercial was done, he would come back and watch the rest of the TV, or watch football or whatever. And then he would go back and do it during the commercial. I mean, it just was really smart because it’s such a small period of time. You’re looking at maybe a minute or two of getting something done before the game or whatever it is you’re watching starts again. I think it’s very clever. I think it [gamefize 00:24:35] it, it makes it just a little bit more engaging.
And I did it this weekend with 2020. I was watching 2020 from Friday night. I was watching it on Saturday. And I would start watching it and then I would run and do whatever I needed to do during the commercials. Yeah. It’s fun.

Pete Wright:
I like it. I like it. My that’s a laundry task.

Nikki Kinzer:
Oh, totally.

Pete Wright:
If I’m watching something and it has a commercial, but see, this is the other thing. We’re in a streaming nation now. Right? So most of the stuff I watch has no commercials in it.

Nikki Kinzer:
I know, I know. And it is annoying when it does.

Pete Wright:
That totally messes up my TV task system.

Nikki Kinzer:
I know. It’s true.

Pete Wright:
How about having a hard time deciding what to do, assuming you’re done with the most critical ones, put the others on a piece of paper and put into jar cup, whatever, and randomly select your task? Now you don’t have to decide between doing dishes versus cleaning the microwave. Let the fate tell you what to do next.

Nikki Kinzer:
That was my third ADHD strategy from a client. So this came from a client too. And this is exactly, I have a little picture of her cup with all of the little things that she picked out that day. But it is also I think a brilliant idea because it does, it takes away the decision. And like you said, let fate decide what you’re going to do that day. I like it.

Pete Wright:
That’s right. That’s right. I wonder if you should put in there, in the mix, a get out of jail free card where you just decide, take it out, it says, don’t do anything.

Nikki Kinzer:
Oh, I love that idea.

Pete Wright:
And then you’re free. That’s the one thing that you get. But I think that to make that work, you’d have to put like empty the dishwasher in there three times.

Nikki Kinzer:
Right. So it’s kind of fair.

Pete Wright:
Because you want that to be a real prize. It can’t be equal. Okay. What do we have next? Something about a chore chalkboard.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yeah. I like it. Do you want me to say it? Okay.

Pete Wright:
No, it’s you. We’re trading.

Nikki Kinzer:
All right. For our family, we have a chores chalkboard where we list them for the day. I write on it daily, from the list of chores I’ve created for easy selections and assigned to me or the kids. I don’t like having to be locked into set chores on set days. So this gives me the flexibility and the structure that works for me. I like it.

Pete Wright:
I like it.

Nikki Kinzer:
It’s very creative.

Pete Wright:
We do a variant of this.This is part of our Sunday planning now. When’s the last time I updated you on our Sunday planning?

Nikki Kinzer:
Oh, it’s been awhile.

Pete Wright:
Yeah. So now we have, because we have two dog walks, one in the morning, one in the evening. We have making dinner for the family and cleaning up dinner afterwards and doing the dishes and putting them all away. And so those are the four big tasks on any given day. And we each just divvy them up on Sunday. So I know on any given day, when I’m cooking, cleaning, dog walking in the morning, dog walking in the afternoon and everyone has the same part. Even my son now will make dinner for the whole family if it’s his night and it’s always waffles and scrambled eggs, always.

Nikki Kinzer:
That’s awesome.

Pete Wright:
Waffles and scrambled eggs for dinner. But it’s really great to have that planned out for the week and have it all documented on the whiteboard so we know exactly who’s doing what, when. It removes so much stress, having those assignments taken care of just in terms of family planning.

Nikki Kinzer:
That’s great. Love that.

Pete Wright:
There you go. That one thing that really helps when I’m really struggling to do anything at all, I’m physically able bodied. So if I have stuff to do, but I’m absolutely stuck on couch inertia, I stopped telling myself I should go wash the dishes or even I really need to go use the bathroom. And I tell myself instead I can stand up. It’s just an undeniable statement of fact. The physically getting up part is easy for me. I don’t worry about what seemingly hard thing comes next. I can just get up. Once I’ve broken the inertia, doing the next thing usually doesn’t seem hard anymore.

Nikki Kinzer:
I like that.

Pete Wright:
Perspective resetting.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yes, it is. And I remember I haven’t done this in a long time, but I remember, Oh, I think when we were way back, when we lived in Portland, my husband and I would wake up, the alarm would go off and we’d kind of just sit there. And then I remember counting, I’d say, “Okay, I’ll count to five. And then I have to get up.” And that just reminded me of that. I remember counting.

Pete Wright:
Right. Inertia.

Nikki Kinzer:
And then I’m like, okay, I’m up. But yeah. It’s great.

Pete Wright:
Yeah.

Nikki Kinzer:
Okay. We have one more.

Pete Wright:
One more. Post-its.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yes. Those long Post-it that are like one by two inches are awesome for breaking down big tasks. When I separate a project, it’s easier for me to see it in quantity and time so I need to make it physical. So what I do is write each task for the project on a Post-it and arrange them so I can see what I’m dealing with. Then when it’s completed, instead of just crossing something off, I remove the sticky and throw it away. That way it’s always getting smaller and I don’t look back on the work and feel exhausted. I love it. It’s a great idea.

Pete Wright:
Yeah. That’s lovely.

Nikki Kinzer:
Yeah. Really, really good.

Pete Wright:
100%. So there we go. That’s our set of getting started and task management system strategies that work most of the time.

Nikki Kinzer:
Most of the time.

Pete Wright:
There’s a lot of really tangible stuff. And as the guy who is super digital like me, it is a great reminder to think broadly when it comes to tools. You can even see on my door, I have a dry erase yearly calendar that I have been using to help me plan the big, long things that I need to see all in one. That has been very, very useful for me. So I see it. This has been a great thing as a part one.

Nikki Kinzer:
Part one.

Pete Wright:
What are we talking about next week? Do you want to give a little teaser?

Nikki Kinzer:
Next week is going to be around focus and alarm tricks because believe it or not, we have one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight alarm tricks. That’s pretty cool.

Pete Wright:
That’s more than I thought alarms could do.

Nikki Kinzer:
I know. So someone is going to learn something about alarms next week, for sure. There you go.

Pete Wright:
Absolutely. Well, thank you everybody for downloading and listening to this show. Thank you all for your time and your attention. Don’t forget if you have something to contribute to this conversation, head over to the show talk channel in our Discord server and you can join us right there by becoming a supporting member at the deluxe level on patreon.com/theadhdpodcast.
On behalf of Nikki Kinzer, I’m Pete Wright, and we’ll see you right back here next week on Taking Control: The ADHD Podcast.