RSLocalFile-562BBF99-8B6F-44EA-825D-1FA5F8C39CC7.png

28 Days Later

Series: Director:

Zombies had notoriously been slow entities—let's face it, the walking dead just don't move so fast. But then Danny Boyle came along and, with writer Alex Garland, injected the zombie sub-genre with speed in their film "28 Days Later." The zombies became fast creatures. And all the more terrifying because of it.

Episode Hosts: ,

Subscribe to The Next Reel in Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or anywhere else you find your favorite podcasts!

Support The Next Reel Family of Film Podcasts • Learn More or Subscribe Now: One-Reeler $1/mo or Two-Reeler $5/mo

"This is what I've seen in the four weeks since infection: people killing people, which is much what I saw in the four weeks before infection and the four weeks before that and before that as far back as I care to remember. People killing people."

Zombies had notoriously been slow entities—let’s face it, the walking dead just don’t move so fast. But then Danny Boyle came along and, with writer Alex Garland, injected the zombie sub-genre with speed in their film “28 Days Later.” The zombies became fast creatures. And all the more terrifying because of it.

Join us—Pete Wright and Andy Nelson—on this week’s episode as we continue our October Horror series by delving into this 2002 film that revolutionized zombie films to come. We talk about how the movie not only altered what people think of zombies and zombie movies, but also how the filmmaking style has since influenced countless low-budget horror filmmakers, including many who shoot projects in the first person film style. We chat about the great actors inhabiting the film, as well as some of the fabulous production people involved. And we also talk about the shift in the third act, how that works for us and really what the filmmakers are trying to say with the story taking the direction it does. It’s a bloody and bloody brilliant film, and definitely a movie we like. Listen in! 

Assorted Notes & Links

Also in :

A show about movies and how they connect.

When the movie ends, our conversation begins.
We love movies. We've been talking about them, one movie a week, since 2011. It's a lot of movies, that's true, but we're passionate about origins and performance, directors and actors, themes and genres, and so much more. So join the community and let's hear about your favorite movies, too.